Milk. It does a body good.

FARMS Advanced | Tehama | Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Location of Field Day:
Duivenvoorden Farms – 19490 Draper Rd. Cottonwood, CA 96022

Field Day Host(s) and Mentors:
Ali Duivenvoorden – Public Relations Manager Mark Duivenvoorden – Owner/Herd Manager

Theme:
Food Safety and Production, Labor

Summary of the Day: To kick off our Tehama County FARMS Advanced year, we visited Duivenvoorden Farms which is a raw dairy in Cottonwood, CA that has been in operation for over 50 years! As we arrived, Mark and Ali Duivenvoorden (and a whole herd of dogs) greeted us and were excited to share their knowledge and love for the dairy industry. We jumped right into the daily operation by joining Mark in the milking parlor to learn some background as well as see first hand the heart and passion that is poured into this local business. It was very touching to hear Mark tell the story of the family dairy that begun over 50 years ago when his parents immigrated from Holland and started the dairy, to him and his wife Lori taking it over in 1993 and now his son and daughter-in-law being a part of the daily operations as well. With the dairy industry being in decline in CA they were faced with finding a niche market to sell their milk in, which is why in 2009 they began selling herd shares which allowed local families to purchase the raw milk for consumption to in 2017 going full retail and building a processing facility to bottle their raw milk for retail sale at markets all over the north state!

The Duivenvoordens herd consists currently of 35 milking cows who all have names. We had the opportunity to learn the process of milking the cows and even try our hand at milking one! We then followed the stainless milk lines to the room where the milk is cooled from 102 degrees to below 50 degrees and stored in a large agitator until it is bottled and distributed twice a week. As you can imagine, with the small scale family business this is a very high labor intensive process. which Ali shared that the days they bottle and distribute, they are all hands on deck to ensure the highest quality milk is delivered to each store.

In order to achieve high quality and consistent flavor, the Duivenvoordens really go the extra mile in care and feeding of their herd. We learned how there cows have access to pasture 365 days a year and are completely grain free! They are fed high quality alfalfa hay year round and fodder during the winter months. What is fodder? In their case, it is barley seeds that are wet and allowed to sprout and grow in trays with no soil which turns into a mat of highly digestible forage for the cows. They are fed this during the months that there pasture grass is primarily dormant, to allow for consistent cream percentage and taste of the milk year round.

To wrap up our day, we took a tour of the farm where we fed the cows, visited the pigs that they feed any “dump milk” or milk that for many reasons doesn’t go into the main tank, and climbed the pile of rice hulls that they use for bedding in the free stalls that the cows can rest in. After this fun and hands on tour, Ali treated us to a glass of their delicious, cold, raw milk and we even made our own butter!

Thank you Duivenvoorden Farms! We had a wonderful day of learning and making memories! Looking forward to another visit during your Milk and Cookies day!

Got GOATS?

FARMS Advanced Program | Kern County | Tuesday, January 28, 2020

Location of Field Day:
Summerhill Dairy
3755 S Sixth Ave, Hanford, CA 93230
 

Field Day Host:
Hannah Wilgenburg- Business and Sales Representative 

Summary of the Day: On Wednesday, January 28, 2020, the Kern County FARMS Advanced Program from McFarland High School started their Advanced year visiting 2,600 dairy goats at Summerhill Dairy. Students first met in the library at McFarland high school enjoying breakfast and practicing introductions for the day. The students were given a KWL worksheet where they will fill out what they know and what they would want to know about the Summerhill Dairy.

The group began the tour at the Dairy with Hannah Wilgenburg that houses 2,600 head of dairy goats of five different breeds that are; Saanen, Nubian, Alpine, Toggenburg and La Manchas. They all have their own certain characteristics from size, appearance and color. We started off getting to see the carousel milking parlor that is able to hold 84 dairy goats at a time that get milked every morning and night. Its the goats favorite part of the day.

We next walked through the barns where all the goats were housed and got to see how they are properly fed. These dairy goats are kept on a well balanced diet including a mixture of grain to help them with their production of milk and also offered roughage such as alfalfa. The students kept asking great questions left and right on everything you could imagine on managing a herd of dairy goats.

The students then got the opportunity to try fresh goat milk from the Summer-hill goat dairy. It was delicious! We then gathered some pictures out front of the beautiful facility of Summerhill Dairy. Thank you again Summerhill Dairy for a Goatastic day!


	

Fruits of our Labor

FARMS Advanced Program | Central Valley | Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Location of Field Day:
Lindcove Extension Research Center
22963 Carson Ave, Exeter, CA 93221

Field Day Host(s) and Mentors:
Dr. Elizabeth E Grafton-Cardwell Ph.D. – Director of Lindcove REC & Research Entomologist UC Riverside
Kurt R. Schmidt – Principal Superintendent of Agriculture
Don Cleek – Agricultural Supervisor
Stephanie Doria – Staff Research Associate I
Adam Kagy – Agricultural Technician

Summary of the Day:
On Wednesday, January 15, 2020, the Central Valley FARMS Advanced Program visited with the folks at the Lindcove Extension Research Center (LREC). We were greeted by Kurt Schmidt. Mr. Schmidt explained that the Lindcove Extension Research Center (LREC) greenhouses, orchards and packline are used by researchers for a variety of studies including developing new citrus rootstocks and scions, evaluating the effects of the local environment on rootstock and scion combinations, screening seedless varieties of mandarins, detecting freeze damage of fruit, and analyzing chemical treatments for pests and post harvest diseases. After learning about what LREC does we went into the citrus grove with their picking crew to learn more about labor in the citrus industry. We learned that there were no mechanical ways of picking and that the labor into the picking was very time consuming and dependent on how quickly they worked and how accurately they picked the best pieces of fruit. We then took what the students picked on their own to the packline to see the automated machines and new technology at work. The California citrus industry, through the California Citrus Quality Council, donated a complete citrus packing line to the LREC in 1995. This 5,000 square foot facility has available for research an FMC high-pressure scale washer, Brogdex waxing and drying equipment, and a Compac fruit-grading unit that can measure number, size, weight, shape, color, texture, density, ºBrix, grade of fruit, and other parameters. This equipment also allows analysis of fruit from individual trees. Students were excited to take some fruit home to enjoy. We thank the team at Lindcover Extension Research Center again for their time and commitment toward our students and our program.