Sunsweet

FARMS Leadership Program | North State | December 13, 2018

Location
Yuba City, CA

Field Day Host(s) and Mentors
Sunsweet

Jamie Dickerson – Talent Acquisition Specialist
Amber Fuentes – HR Administrator
Tracy Atondo – Membership & Dryer Services Coordinator
Nathan Martson – Field Representative & Marysville Dryer Manager
Alma Parham – Administrative Assistant & Receptionist

Theme
Food Production and Consumer Science

Summary of the Day
Our field day at Sunsweet began with an introduction by Jamie Dickerson. She talked about the background and history of Sunsweet. Sunsweet operates the largest dried fruit plant in the world. Jamie also discussed with the students the different types of jobs and careers Sunsweet has to offer. Next Jamie introduced Tracy Atondo to the students. Tracy continued Jamie’s presentation and discussed Sunsweet in more depth and talked about how Sunsweet has become the success it is today and how they work with the farmers who grow the products they sell. After their presentation; Jamie, Tracy, and Amber passed out some Sunsweet merchandise to all the students. We then headed over to the Sunsweet Dryer in Marysville where we me Nathan Martson. He chatted with the students about the dryer side of the Sunsweet operation. Nathan then gave us a tour of the facility which he manages.

AgVocacy at Cosumnes River College

FARMS Leadership Program | Sac Valley and San Joaquin | December 11, 2018

Field Day Host(s)
Cosumnes River College
Bayer Crop Sciences
California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA)

Mentors
Kelly O’Halloran – Bayer Crop Sciences
Jacqueline Airoso – Collections Manager & Environmental Scientist – CDFA
Traci Scott – Outreach Specialist – Cosumnes River College
David Andrews – Professor of Horticulture – Cosumnes River College

Theme
College and Career Opportunities

Summary of the Day
The Sacramento Valley and San Joaquin FARMS Leadership Programs joined together for a field day at Cosumnes River College (CRC). The field day began with a group activity called Human Knot. This activity was designed for students to meet one another and then work together to problem solve and untangle them selves to form a circle.

After the group activity, our first presenter for the day was introduced. Kelly O’Halloran presented to the group. She gave an overview of Bayer Crop Sciences and also discussed the many different jobs that are associated with in their company. She also had a presentation on AgVocacy, which enables those who are passionate about modern agriculture to discuss the importance of agriculture, food production and the innovation needed to nourish our growing world.

Our second guest speaker for the day was Jacqueline Airoso from the CDFA. She gave a presentation on who the CDFA is and what they do. She also discussed plant pest’s and diagnostics.

Following our presentations Traci Scott gave us a tour of the Cosumnes River College Campus. We ended the tour at the Horticulture Department where David Andrews showed the students around and discussed the different courses offered at CRC. The students enjoyed walking around the garden and harvesting some late fall crops to sample and bring home.

 

 

A Handful of Almonds…

(MADERA, CA) On Wednesday, September 26th, Students from the Central Valley North FARMS Leadership Program stepped out of the classroom to learn about the steps to harvesting almonds at Creekside Farming Company Inc. and learning about The Almond Company’s business.  Meeting for the first time were 30 sophomore and juniors students from Clovis East High School, Kerman High School, Liberty High School, and Madera South High Schools.

FARMS stands for Farming, Agriculture and Resource Management for Sustainability, which is a premier Leadership Program run by the Center for Land-Based Learning.  This statewide youth program connects high school students to California’s food system and teaches them leadership skills through a year of field days on farms, ranches and agribusinesses.  They get to explore college and career opportunities in agriculture, food and environmental science while helping them develop critical thinking skills through hands-on experiences. “It is so important for students to learn about the agriculture that surrounds them.”, said Katie Wortman, the FARMS Leadership Coordinator for the Central Valley.

The Madera County Farm Bureau provided the meeting space for the Leadership portion of the Field Day.  The day started out with the designation of leadership teams and students practicing the proper handshake.  Students got to know each other by interviewing each other and introduced each other as a preparation for introducing our individual speakers.  Each predetermined student interviewed each speaker of the day and introduced them to the group as a whole. Next, the group traveled to The Almond Company and were welcomed by Anthony Sagariballa, Director of Plant Operations and Jerry Magdaleno, Grower Relations.

Our students were treated to a company presentation, almond tasting, facility tour, and lunch. Finally, we ended our day with Creekside Farming. Jay Mahil, Owner and Eli Gallegos, Ranch Manager met us for an in-depth tour of harvesting Almonds. Students were able to watch how Almond trees are harvested including the shaking, sweeping and picking up of Almonds.  Almonds were then transferred to the truck and delivered to the processor. Our FARMS students did an excellent job asking questions and being engaged in the day.

NRCS Plant Material Center

FARMS Leadership Program: San Joaquin: November 29th, 2018

Location: Lockeford, CA

Field Day Host(s) and Mentors:
Margaret Smither-Kopperl
Matthew Bronson, PMC Farm Manager

Theme: Ecology and Habitat Conservation

 Summary of the Day:

The San Joaquin FARMS Leadership Students had no intentions of letting a little rain stop them from learning about Ecology and Habitat Conservation at the Plant Material Center (PMC) in Lockeford, Ca. Although our plans did change due to the rain and heavy winds that rolled in, we had a fun filled day learning a lot about what happens in the daily operations at the Natural Resource Center. The day started out with a tour of the facilities led by Matthew Bronson the Farm Manager at the PMC. The students were able to see and learn about the different equipment used, tractors, and even were able to walk through the seed library where numerous amounts of native California plant seeds are stored.

 

After Matthew’s tour the students gathered in the PMC’s office meeting room where they were broken up into groups to team project. The Project they all worked on was to draft a landscape at the PMC using a variety of different native plants. The students were given a list of native plants as well as books and information on each plant so that they could design the landscape of an actual area of land that the PMC has that needs to be re-planted. Once the groups finished their designs we took a lunch break.

 

Following our lunch break Margaret Smither-Kopperl took over to discuss the different plants the students chose. She then gave us a tour of the property where the students were able to see examples of the plants they chose and take cuttings from each plant along the way. Once each group had a handful of cuttings from the plants the chose they were able to work with Matthew and Margaret to prep the cuttings and plant them into the green house so that the PMC could utilize them in the landscape that the students designed.

 

Holy Cow! A Mooovement Toward Sustainability

FARMS Leadership | Kern County | November 13, 2018

Lakeview Farms
17702 Bear Mountain Blvd, Bakersfield, CA 93311

Field Day Host(s) and Mentors:
B.J. Schoneveld, Owner Lakeview Farms
Roy Dowd, Director – CalBio Energy Facility O&M, & Digester Research
Jamie Jarrett Ph.D., Dairy Nutritionist – Alpha Dairy Consulting

Theme:
Science in Agriculture

Summary of the Day:
Students from Frontier High School, West High School, Independence High School, Ridgeview High School, and Bakersfield Christian High School gathered for breakfast at the Kern County Ag Pavilion, after we loaded the bus to head out to Lakeview Dairy. When we arrived, we hit the ground running with an overview of the 9,500 head dairy farm and a tour of the milk house. Owner, B.J. Schoneveld, shared the technology used using the EID Ear Tag Reader. Students were able to see reports generated from the field with the EID Tag Reader and learn about the importance of tracking health and genetics. Students then walked to the barns where cows were served their morning feed. They were shocked with how many things they recognized in the feed – carrots, cotton, and almond hulls. They smelled the sourness of the feed. We noticed the temperature of the barn. Mr Schoneveld has tried a new approach with the cows in climate control. He has placed share cloth and fans strategically in the barn to not only keep the cows cool, but to keep their food cooler as well. This has made a huge difference in their production and feed intake. Cows like eating cooler feed. Happy cows make happy milk. We then went into the newborn calf pen where students were able to touch and take photos with the newly born calves. These calves are shipped to Hanford where they will be fed and cared for until they are old enough to return to the dairy for milk production. After touring the barns, we met Roy Dowd who introduced us to the manure digester.

Lakeview’s partnership with California Bioenergy is a cutting edge approach to sustainability. Not only does it process the manure, allowing the farm to recycle the solid matter for bedding, but it also allows them to use the liquid to create energy through bacteria and gas production. The water that is cycled through then is used to clean parts of the dairy. This approach will allow them to partner with other diaries creating a cohort of dairies who will be working with PG&E on the energy output, thus getting paid for the energy they create. We discussed the many careers in this up and coming field. Mr. Dowd was born and raised in went to college in Bakersfield. Learning about how he achieved his goals was a learning for the students. What’s more appetizing that discussing manure? We were served a fantastic lunch provided by Lakeview Farms. During lunch we met Nutritionist, Jamie Jarrett.

She shared her career journey with the students and the colleges she attended. She was an alumni of one of our participating high schools which was a connection point for students. She then took us to the feed area. Here there were mountains of ingredients/commodities used in the cow feed. She brought out 4 buckets of different mixed feed and discussed the fat content and nutritional value of each mix. She had students pick up a handful and share what they saw and asked why they thought they might feed that item. Items included carrots that they get from neighboring farms as well as almond hulls. Students have eaten carrots but almond hulls a new idea for them. Students know about almonds, but not in their natural state – coming from a shell and hull. We talked about the sustainability this offers – where nothing is wasted. Students came away with an understanding of the care and efforts made to get milk into our homes. They learned about the science used to make a smaller footprint on the earth. They also learned about the sustainability efforts being made by other farmers, like the almond farmer, to be sure that nothing is wasted.

Students learn about the parts of the milk house and the tests run to keep our food safe.

Cooling the Barn and the Affects on the Cows.

Premier Mushrooms and Colusa Industrial Properties

FARMS Leadership | North State | November 6, 2018

Location of Field Day:
Premier Mushrooms and Colusa Industrial Properties
Colusa, CA

Field Day Host(s) and Mentors:
John Ashbaugh – Premier Mushrooms, CEO
Chris Krebs – Premier Mushrooms, Chief Operating Officer
Kevin Foley – Premier Mushrooms, Sustainability Programs Manager
Ed Hulbert – Colusa Industrial Properties, CEO

Theme: Sustainability

Summary of the Day:
The North State FARMS Leadership Program began our field days for the 2018-2019 school year at Colusa Industrial Properties and Premier Mushroom in Colusa, California. Premier Mushrooms employees the largest number of people within Colusa Industrial Properties (CIP) at around 230 employees. They are also operating 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The FARMS Leadership students were given an introduction to Premier Mushrooms by Chris Krebs, the Chief Operating Officer. Then the students were split up into 3 groups and taken on tours of the facilities. During the tour the students were able to see many different jobs throughout the operation. They were also able to learn about the different varieties of mushrooms and see them at many different stages. After touring the main facilities and seeing different grow rooms we traveled over to the processing and packaging facility for a tour. Concluding our tours, we went back over to CIP for lunch and the FARMS Leadership students were joined by some of the staff from Premier Mushrooms. The staff all gave presentations on where they came from, how they ended up working at Premier Mushrooms, and what they do for the company now. They were all very insightful and the students were able to see a wide range of backgrounds and employees. After lunch Ed Hulbert, the CEO of Colusa Industrial Properties, joined us and discussed with the students the background of CIP and talked about the different companies there and CIP’s connection to Premier Mushrooms.

 

“One thing I didn’t know about mushrooms that I learned today was the mass quantities in which they grow in a short period of time.” – Madi D. (Marysville High School)

 

“Something I learned from this field day was that it takes at least 15 days to make good compost.” – Katie W. (Pierce High School).

 

Sierra Pacific Industries

FARMS Leadership| Tehama County | November 6, 2018

Location of Field Day:
Richfield, CA

Field Day Host:
Sierra Pacific Industries – Becky Roe and Kristy Lanham

Participating Partners:
Bill Carol, Joe Puentes, Christina Max, Jeff Jackman, Jim Hansen

Theme:
Technology and Manufacturing

Summary of the Day:
After such a severe wildfire year in CA, it was very fitting to visit Sierra Pacific Industries (SPI) and learn from one of the leaders in the logging and lumber industry what really happens to all those burnt trees after a major forest fire such as the Carr Fire.

Spending our day at SPI Richfield we were exposed to two different processing facilities: their remanufacturing plant and one of their millwork plants. Students broke up into two groups and had to opportunity to tour one of the plants and then did a speaking activity by presenting to the other group as well as SPI staff what they learned, careers they saw and what their favorite part was. Learning skills such as public speaking, preparing a presentation in a short amount of time, as well as how to collaborate with other students are all an important part of our FARMS Field Days. Some of the key things they learned exploring the facilities were:

“The wood in the Millwork was cut into small pieces and glued back together to form bigger pieces, then they press the wood to keep it’s form.”                                                                                                              – Melanie Flores, Orland High School Student

“Some of the jobs in the Reman facility are: chain pullers, banding, optimizer operator, and forklift driver.”                                                   -Zach Skaggs, Red Bluff High School Student

 

SPI and Red Emmerson are the largest private land owner with over 2 million acres of land between California and Washington. Therefore, they have very detailed processes and procedures for how they handle their land after a wildfire has roared through. Joe Puentes, one of their lead foresters, gave a wonderful presentation on the importance forest management and how they manage their forests differently being a private company versus a government agency as well as the extreme urgency of time to replant the forests and restore the environmental balance as quickly as possible.

“After a fire they replant double to amount of trees.”                            – Clayton Cox, Corning High School Student

” 12,000 trees a day can be planted for a crew of 12 laborers!”           – Forrest Powell, Los Molinos High School

Urban Agriculture in Stockton, California

FARMS Leadership | San Joaquin | October 30, 2018

Location of Field Day:
Boggs Tract Community Farm
Stockton, CA

Theme: Urban Agriculture

Field Day Host(s) and Mentors:
Kenda Templeton, Puentes Deputy Director & Operations Manager
Clifton Maxwell, Urban Farm Manager
Javier Gardea, Urban Forestry Coordinator
George Dale, Bee Keeper

Summary of the Day:
The San Joaquin FARMS Leadership Program began our field days for the 2018-2019 school year at Boggs Tract Community Farm in Stockton, CA learning about urban agriculture. Bogg’s Tract Community Farm allows local residents to lease a plot to grow food for their families or to sell at local farmer’s markets. There are also other crops grown to support the region year around as well as farm fresh eggs and honey being produced. The community farm also hosts numerous work shops and education events year around.

The FARMS Leadership students were able to learn about irrigation and pull out and replace irrigation lines in the garden beds. They also fixed up some of the garden beds and leveled them out, added soil, and replaced the straw over the top. The students also learned about compost and were able to help make more for the farms use. In addition to that they were able to plant some winter crops with the Urban Farm Manager, Clifton Maxwell. After lunch the students were visited by George Dale who is a local Bee Keeper. The community farm is one of the locations where George farms bee’s and he was a wealth of knowledge for the students to learn about bee keeping and he provided an endless supply of facts about honey bee’s.

FARMS Leadership Gets Nutty in Sacramento Valley

FARMS Leadership | Sacramento Valley | October 25, 2018

Locations of Field Day: Sierra Orchards and Mariani Nut Company, Winters, CA

Theme: Sustainability

Field Day Host(s) and Mentors:
Craig McNamara, Owner and Manager of Sierra Orchards
AJ Gomez, Farmer at Sierra Orchards
Max Mariani, Production Manager at Mariani Nut Company

Summary of the Day:
This year the Sacramento Valley FARMS Leadership Program kicked off our field days for the 2018-2019 school year at Sierra Orchards in Winters, CA. The day started off with breakfast and ice breakers giving the students the opportunity to meet people from other schools. Following the ice-breaker the students were given an over view of what to expect for the year within the FARMS Leadership Program. We then all caravanned over to Mariani Nut Company where Max Mariani gave us an overview of the company, a tour of the facilities, and then allowed the students to sort walnuts on the factory line. After the tour of Mariani the group headed back to Sierra Orchards where we all enjoyed lunch and discussed what we learned on the tour. Following lunch, AJ Gomez gave us an introduction to Sierra Orchards and then led the group on a tour. He drove a tractor hauling a hay trailer so that the students could see the walnut orchard and harvest up close and personal.

What Do I Want to Be? How Do I Get There?

FARMS Leadership | Kern County | October 16, 2018

Bakersfield College
1801 Panorama Dr, Bakersfield, CA 93305

Field Day Host(s) and Mentors:
Kern County Farm Bureau
Bakersfield College Staff
Heather Baltis

Theme:
Career and Career Path Exploration

Summary of the Day:
Often times, students have an opinion about attending Junior Colleges. There is sadly a stigma that we as educators fight on a regular basis about attending anything other than a 4-year college path. Today, I fought to blast this stigma with our visit to the nationally known Bakersfield College Ag Department.

Students from Frontier High School, Independence High School, Ridgeview High School, Bakersfield Christian High School, and West High School were amazed at the professionalism and opportunities available to them at Bakersfield College.

This day was not your average College Visit. Bakersfield College partners with industry to bring professionals who are making a living with these degrees. This tangible approach allows for students to ask questions, network with local industry, and really imagine what it would be like to walk in their shoes. Industry professionals share their journey giving insight into how they got to their current position.

Bakersfield College provided lunch and a time for students to meet with different colleges and possible employers. Our students passed out business cards to those employers where they were interested in connecting on a deeper level.

It was a great day! Thank you, Bakersfield College!

Alyssa Jones, FARMS Leadership student, shares her experience with the Vet Technician Program