IPM and Citrus

IPM and Citrus

Program: Central Valley FARMS Advanced

Region: Central Valley

Field Date: Thursday, October 11th

Location of Field Day:  Lindcove Research & Extension Center

Field Day Host(s) and Mentors: Dr. Elizabeth E Grafton-Cardwell Ph.D.

Theme: IPM and Citrus

Summary of the Day: On Thursday, October 11, 2018, the Central Valley FARMS Advanced Group met for the first time during the 2018-2019 school year.  The students worked with Dr. Grafton-Cardwell, as she explained red scale. The students received a hands-on experienced looking at red scale under the microscopes.  With the deadly citrus disease, Huanglongbing expected to arrive in the near future in urban areas of California through a small insect called the Asian citrus psyllid, educating the public not to move plant material and watching for pests and diseases is critical.  Students then were able to get more hands-on experience in the local citrus orchard used by the Center for education. Students found the infected fruit on the trees from what they learned in the morning session. What a great first field day for all! The students are excited to learn more this year about IPM in the Central Valley.



Program: FARMS Advanced

Region: Central Valley

Field Date: Thursday, October 11th

Location of Field Day:  Lindcove Research & Extension Center

Field Day Host(s) and Mentors: Dr. Elizabeth E Grafton-Cardwell Ph.D.

Theme: IPM and Citrus

Summary of the Day: On Thursday, October 11, 2018, the Central Valley FARMS Advanced Group met for the first time during the 2018-2019 school year.  The students worked with Dr. Grafton-Cardwell, as she explained red scale. The students received a hands-on experienced looking at red scale under the microscopes.  With the deadly citrus disease, Huanglongbing expected to arrive in the near future in urban areas of California through a small insect called the Asian citrus psyllid, educating the public not to move plant material and watching for pests and diseases is critical.  Students then were able to get more hands-on experience in the local citrus orchard used by the Center for education. Students found the infected fruit on the trees from what they learned in the morning session. What a great first field day for all! The students are excited to learn more this year about IPM in the Central Valley.

ALBA – Agriculture Land-Based Training Association

FARMS Leadership | Monterey and Santa Cruz | October 11, 2018

Participating Schools:
Everett Alverez High School
Gonzales High School
Soledad High School
Watsonville High School

Location(s) of Field Day:
ALBA Campus 1700 Old Stage Road, Salinas Ca

Field Day Hosts and Mentors:
Nathan Harkleroad, ALBA Education Program Director
Patty Howe, ALBA Administrative Director
Samantha Tuttle, ALBA Student Intern
Juana Hernandez, ALBA Administrative Assistant
Leo Sanchez and Rebecca Hernandez, Lazy Millennial Farms, Owners
Rudy Jimenez, Green Thumb Organics, Owner
Victor Cortez, La Granjita Farms, Owner

Summary of the Day:

Our Monterey and Santa Cruz FARMS Leadership Program kicked off their first field day with a visit to the ALBA, Agriculture and Land-Based Training Association, Campus. After breakfast, we had an icebreaker activity – a name game allowing students to get to know each other and to help us all remember names. The students collected program goodies and supplies. Then, we had an open discussion about the organic industry. We talked about what we knew about organic produce and production. We also explored the areas we had questions about and made a note to ask them along the way.

Here are some of the questions students had:

“How much is [farm] land and why is it so expensive?” – Randy Huynh, NSH

“What are the downsides [with organics]?” – Hailey Higgins, SHS

“Why is organic food more expensive?” – Sonia Vargas, GHS

“What’s the process to becoming an organic farmer?” – WHS

In our discussion, we also talked about how ALBA was a non-profit organization with a mission.


ALBA’s mission is to create economic opportunity for limited-resource and aspiring organic farmers through land-based education in the heart of the Salinas Valley. 

Continue reading “ALBA – Agriculture Land-Based Training Association”

All about Cotton!!

FARMS Leadership| Central Valley | October 9, 2018

Participating Schools
El Diamante High School, Visalia; Mt. Whitney High School, Visalia; Lindsay High School, Lindsay; and Hanford High School, Hanford.

Location
Tulare & Visalia, CA

Field Day Host(s) and Mentors
Farm Credit West, Tulare; Cardoza Farming Company; Mid-Valley Cotton Growers, Inc. and USDA Cotton Program Classing Office, Visalia

Summary of the Day
On Tuesday, October 9, 2018, the Central Valley South FARMS Leadership Program students enjoyed a fun-filled,  field day learning about the Cotton Industry. The students who consist of Lindsay High School, Hanford High School, El Diamante High School, and Mt. Whitney High School, started off at 9am meeting at Farm Credit West in Tulare. We were welcomed by Jonathan Kennedy, Senior Vice President.  Here students covered a few leadership activities such as practicing, how to properly introduce a host and thanking them for their time and sharing their knowledge with our students.

Next, the group caravanned to our field located south-west of Tulare where Cardoza Company was harvesting a cotton field.  Here, Curtis Lafler, a student from Hanford High School introduced Mr. David Cardoza, President of Cardoza Company. Mr. Cardoza talked with the group about the growing, maintenance and harvesting of cotton. Next, the group headed to Mid-Valley Cotton Growers, Inc., in Tulare, where we were welcomed by Stan Creelman.  Stan showed us the entire process from unloading the truck to accepting the cotton. It takes approximately 2 minutes of travel time to where the seed is removed and the cotton is put into bales ready to be shipped overseas where it is typically made into clothing.

One student said they learned how cotton farming is a sustainable practice, “I learned about how everything is recycled and reused, so nothing goes to waste”. Another student learned, “the fiber on the cotton seeds helps the cows digestion.” This fact refers to the nutrition component that we cover in the program. Finally, we traveled to the USDA Classing Office in Visalia, CA where we enjoyed a quick lunch provided by FARMS. Finally, we spoke to Greg Townsend, the Area Director of the USDA Classing Office. The students learned the process of how the machines now classify and grade the cotton.  We learned that this process used to be done completely by people and the last part of grading still is. We definitely enjoyed our day and thanks to all of our partners for the day; Farm Credit West, Cardoza Company, Mid-Valley Cotton Growers Association Inc., and the USDA Cotton Program Classing Office in Visalia, CA.