Maggenti Show Goats

Maggenti show goats raises about 250+ of Boer Goats. They’ve been raising  Boer goats for about 10 years now. They sell year round too local and out of state kids for market projects. Showing livestock brings families and friends together while creating everlasting memories.  Their goal is to create competitive goats in a fun and healthy environment.

Raising livestock is a full time job. The animals depend on you everyday to supply their food and water. We will kid out babies year round and sell them in lives auctions or an online sale throughout the year. We typically sell casterated males which are called wethers. We will sell wethers for livestock shows once they are weaned around four to five months old. They will then go to their new family where they will be raised and fed and prepared for show. We usually keep all our females to help grow the herd and to replace older females.

We also do a lot of Artificial insemenation work and Embryo Transfer. To help increase your herd quality most people will Flush an amazing female goat and put her embryos into what we call Recip also known as a surrogate. You can get anywhere from 1 to 30+ embryos from one flush on a Donor female. This benefits your program by allowing you to multiply that breeding by one flush rather than having just 1 baby from that Donor. These Recips will then carry the babies for 5 months and kid them out and raise them.

Embryos under the microscope.

There are other important factors that go into raising livestock. You have to be sure to stay up to date on vaccinations and deworming protocols to make sure they stay healthy and don’t run into any health issues. We start vaccinations when they are a day old to boost their immunity and to keep them healthy. Health is the number one key to keeping your herd reproductive.

During the zoom meeting we went into detail on how to read a feed tag. A feed tag gives you all the ingredients and information you need to know what your animal is eating. It is very important in the livestock world to know and keep track to what our animal is taking in. We went through step by step and learned how to properly read a feed tag from top to bottom. The students also received a sample bag of some goat feed to identify what they thought was each ingredient listed on the feed tag. We had a great time and loved seeing the babies!!

GOT GRAPES?

FARMS Advanced Program | Kern County | Thursday, November 12th, 2020

Field Day Partner:
AC Foods/AC Farming

Field Day Host
Priscila Reuland- Project Coordinator
Bryce Chudy- Chief Agronomist

Summary of the Day: On Thursday, November 12th, 2020, the Kern County FARMS Advanced Program from McFarland High School had a Zoom field day with AC Foods. The day before the field day, students were hand delivered kits from AC Foods that consisted of a variety of their green and red holiday grapes. Students were also given a refractometer which they used during the live meeting with the Chief Agronomist.

As the students joined the meetings, they were being introduced to our hosts Bryce Chudy and Priscila Reuland. We talked about Columbine Vineyard, AC Foods sister company. We discussed the Refractometer which is the tool used to measure the sugar content in the grapes.

The higher the number the higher the sugar content in the grape. Each variety has its own measurement, such as a red grape will have a higher sugar content than your green grapes. The measuring of sugar content in all fruit is very important. It helps determine the correct time to harvest the fruit for consumption. It was a great informational field day!!

Below is the link for the Virtual Field Day:

BEEF. IT’S WHAT’S FOR DINNER.

FARMS Advanced Program | Kern County | Thursday, February 27, 2020

Location of Field Day:
Red House Beef
649 Enos Ln Bakersfield, CA 93314

Field Day Host
Maddie Herndon- Ranch Manager
Debbie Wise- Owner

Summary of the Day: On Thursday, February 27, 2020, the Kern County FARMS Advanced Program from McFarland High School visited Redhouse Beef. We started off the day meeting with their herd manager Maddie Herndon. Maddie started off the tour by telling us the history of the company and when it began. Next, she explained all the different breeds of cattle and described each of their breed characteristics. The majority of their herd is Angus and Red Angus cattle. These two breeds are known for being the best for meat production. We learned a lot about the marbling of meat which is the fat and gives meat a lot of its flavor. We then met with the owner Debbie Wise who explained more about the beef side of the company. Debbie has a lot of knowledge about the agriculture industry and it was very interesting listening to all she had to say.

We then moved onto the grass-fed chickens they raise at Redhouse. The hens are rotated throughout the pasture along with the chicken coop on wheels. It is very impressive. These Red House hens were so pampered living a fat and happy life. There where different varieties of chickens which means they lay different colored eggs. The girls graze on bugs, clover, and grass that make their yolks a bright orange color. Everyone loved them so much that we had to take a picture with them!

Finally, we walked the orchards to look at the almond trees. They were blooming so it was great to see them in this stage. About 20% of the flowers you see on the almond trees will then turn into almonds. The weather plays a huge role in the production of the almond’s trees. Too much chill can knock off the blooms and set them back. A crucial step is the pollination of the trees. Honey bees play a major role with around 80% of the United States crop depending on them for pollination. All bees in the colony have their own jobs. We talked a little about the jobs and how crucial each bee is to the colony. The bee colonies consist of a single queen bee, hundreds of male’s drones and 20,000 plus female worker bees. It was amazing to hear how a small creature has such an important job and how their hive works.

This was an informative experience and we are grateful for our amazing hosts at Redhouse Beef. Thank you! We look forward to our next visit!