Milk. It does a body good.

FARMS Advanced | Tehama | Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Location of Field Day:
Duivenvoorden Farms – 19490 Draper Rd. Cottonwood, CA 96022

Field Day Host(s) and Mentors:
Ali Duivenvoorden – Public Relations Manager Mark Duivenvoorden – Owner/Herd Manager

Theme:
Food Safety and Production, Labor

Summary of the Day: To kick off our Tehama County FARMS Advanced year, we visited Duivenvoorden Farms which is a raw dairy in Cottonwood, CA that has been in operation for over 50 years! As we arrived, Mark and Ali Duivenvoorden (and a whole herd of dogs) greeted us and were excited to share their knowledge and love for the dairy industry. We jumped right into the daily operation by joining Mark in the milking parlor to learn some background as well as see first hand the heart and passion that is poured into this local business. It was very touching to hear Mark tell the story of the family dairy that begun over 50 years ago when his parents immigrated from Holland and started the dairy, to him and his wife Lori taking it over in 1993 and now his son and daughter-in-law being a part of the daily operations as well. With the dairy industry being in decline in CA they were faced with finding a niche market to sell their milk in, which is why in 2009 they began selling herd shares which allowed local families to purchase the raw milk for consumption to in 2017 going full retail and building a processing facility to bottle their raw milk for retail sale at markets all over the north state!

The Duivenvoordens herd consists currently of 35 milking cows who all have names. We had the opportunity to learn the process of milking the cows and even try our hand at milking one! We then followed the stainless milk lines to the room where the milk is cooled from 102 degrees to below 50 degrees and stored in a large agitator until it is bottled and distributed twice a week. As you can imagine, with the small scale family business this is a very high labor intensive process. which Ali shared that the days they bottle and distribute, they are all hands on deck to ensure the highest quality milk is delivered to each store.

In order to achieve high quality and consistent flavor, the Duivenvoordens really go the extra mile in care and feeding of their herd. We learned how there cows have access to pasture 365 days a year and are completely grain free! They are fed high quality alfalfa hay year round and fodder during the winter months. What is fodder? In their case, it is barley seeds that are wet and allowed to sprout and grow in trays with no soil which turns into a mat of highly digestible forage for the cows. They are fed this during the months that there pasture grass is primarily dormant, to allow for consistent cream percentage and taste of the milk year round.

To wrap up our day, we took a tour of the farm where we fed the cows, visited the pigs that they feed any “dump milk” or milk that for many reasons doesn’t go into the main tank, and climbed the pile of rice hulls that they use for bedding in the free stalls that the cows can rest in. After this fun and hands on tour, Ali treated us to a glass of their delicious, cold, raw milk and we even made our own butter!

Thank you Duivenvoorden Farms! We had a wonderful day of learning and making memories! Looking forward to another visit during your Milk and Cookies day!

Sustainable to the Last Fiber

FARMS Leadership | Tehama | Thursday, January 16, 2020

Location of Field Day:
Sierra Pacific Industries – 19794 Riverside Ave. Anderson, CA 96007

Field Day Host(s) and Mentors:
Kristy Lanham, Community Relations Manager Katie Luther, Workforce Development and Communications Coordinator Drew Peterson, Electrical Supervisor Tanner Estes, Safety and Environmental Coordinator Angie Harris, Office Coordinator Fabrication Shop

Theme:
Technology and Manufacturing

Summary of the Day: Tehama County FARMS Leadership kicked off our year on January 16th at Sierra Pacific Industries in Anderson, CA. They have been a generous supporter of our FARMS programs throughout the state and this field day was no exception. While the weather was a bit grey and drizzly, we still took full advantage of our visit and were able to explore their sawmill, cogen plant, and fab/tech shop.

Kristy Lanham, SPI’s Community Relations Manager, and Katie Luther their Workforce Development and Communications Coordinator greeted us and gave some wonderful background information into Sierra Pacific Industries and what sets them apart from many other companies. They truly pride themselves on being a 3rd generation family run company that believes in growing their people, investing in their communities and being sustainable to the last fiber.

Largest crane west of the Mississippi loading logs onto the log deck.

Tanner Estes, Safety and Environmental Coordinator then joined us to be our guide as we headed out to see exactly how they are sustainable to the last fiber. We began by watching the largest crane west of the Mississippi River placing logs on the log deck. These logs have come from somewhere on the 2 million acres of forests Mr. Emmerson owns in CA and WA, making Sierra Pacific the 2nd largest lumber producer in the United States. As the logs enter the sawmill they are run through a de-barker and cut into lengths appropriate for the boards they will be but into. The students were absolutely fascinated by the technology, speed and size of the equipment being used. We met several of the employees that were inspecting the lumber for quality as well as operating some of the equipment along the way. Seeing the process from raw log to 2 X 4 that you could purchase at Home Depot was amazing! As we walked out of the sawmill Tanner talked to us about the waste they produce and how every single fiber is consumed wether it be shipped out as lumber, or used as fuel for their cogen plant. As we stood and watched the cogen steam we learned that they not only produce enough power to run their facility, but they feed energy back into the grid to provide power for much of the community. They also use the steam to dry their own lumber and any of the steam that is left over is looped around and continued in the cycle. Talk about efficient! Wow!

Lastly we headed over to the Fab/Tech Shop where Drew Peterson, Electrical Supervisor, toured us through this very high tech and state-of-the-art facility. We learned that Sierra Pacific designs and builds all of their equipment so they employ computer designers, electrical and mechanical engineers, fabricators, and many others that support this process. As we walked through the fab shop Drew showed how far the technology has come and that it is moving more and more into robotics. This is one of the highest tech operations in our area and truly offers wonderful opportunities for not only careers but also internships for those interested.

Our day wrapped up with a fabulous lunch provided by SPI and an opportunity for questions to be answered. The students were impressed by the company values as well as career opportunities they learned about. Many were surprised that they could begin a job right out of high school if they wanted and grow within the company into a very respectable career position. They also were intrigued with the scholarship opportunities that SPI offers to the children of their employees. Thank you Sierra Pacific Industries for all you pour into our program and the youth of today!

A Berry Good Day

FARMS Leadership| Tehama County | May 16, 2019

Location of Field Day
Red Bluff, CA

Field Day Host
Melissa Macfarlane
Shannon Lambert
Chris Hunter

Participating Schools
Red Bluff High School
Mercy High School
Los Molinos High School
Corning High School

Theme
Technology

Summary of the Day:
To wrap up the Tehama County FARMS Leadership year, we were treated to a “berry good day” at Driscoll’s. Students arrived eager to pick and eat strawberries straight from the field. Little did they know that at the Red Bluff Driscoll’s nursery location, it is just that….a nursery. Their focus is growing the plants that will then get shipped to growers all over the world, who then plant them in fields to grow berries for our eating. However, in true Driscoll’s fashion, breakfast consisted of platters of strawberries, blueberries, blackberries and raspberries with yogurt and granola to enjoy the best parfait’s they ever have had.

Melissa Macfarlane welcomed us with a great presentation about Driscoll’s as a company and explained just what they did at their nursery and why it is so important. Students learned the difference between a “sibling” and a “clone” as well as why it was necessary for the farmers to be planting clones and not siblings. She then turned it over to Chris, who gave a presentation on “mapping” and the technology that is associated with it. He went over: What is a map? The difference between a geographical map and position map and then introduced the students to what our hands on tasks would be for the day once we broke up into 3 groups.

Each group explored a different job that takes place at the nursery. One group went out into the field and learned what goes into planning how many plants a farmer is going to need and just how to go about planting and multiplying those plants on the nursery level. Another group spent their time in “the office” learning all that goes into mapping from the computer level and the importance of data collection in the field being entered into their system correctly. They also had the opportunity to identify a problem, and learn the procedure for correcting the problem and communicating with other staff the changes that were made and corrections that needed to take place out in the nursery. The last group went out to one of the screen-houses and did a map check validation. They were shown how the plants are planted into bins and then maintained to allow for optimal growth of daughter plants. Then they were given a map which they needed to review and check that the information printed was actually what was physically in the screen-house. They did such an excellent job and found 4 corrections that needed to be made.

Once we all gathered again, the groups took time to prepare a power point presentation to share with their fellow FARMS members what they learned and why it was important. This entire field day was fabulous at showing the importance of technology and how high tech farming is. Each student was encouraged to continue to expand their computer skills and knowledge throughout their education because agriculture as an industry is very progressive and continues to grow with our times.