Take the Weiß Pill

FARMS Leadership | Sacramento Valley | February 20, 2020

Location of Field Day: Bayer, 37437 CA-16 Woodland, CA 95695

Hosts: Lisa McDaniel, Head of Global Outreach & Engagement

The Sacramento Valley Field Day at Bayer Woodland began in the front lobby of the sprawling, iron-gated compound. We were promptly met by Lisa McDaniel, Head of Global Outreach & Engagement.

Once our entire class arrived, Lisa escorted us to a boardroom on the second floor of an even larger building on the opposite side of the Bayer Woodland campus. Upon arrival at our second meeting place, we conducted an “open circle”, students introduced themselves, we reviewed the day’s itinerary, and we were provided id badges to wear for the duration of our tour. Following a ‘hotel breakfast’ of multigrain bars, muffins, yogurt, juice, and coffee, we headed out for a tour the various research and development facilities.

Our first stops were a series of greenhouses where we learned about the safety measures taken to protect crop yields. We learned about specialty breeding and the genome-tracking processes that ensure the strongest, most drought-resistant produce. We then toured their maintenance facility where we learned that the use of GPS systems can help better track crop development.

After our tour of the grounds, we regrouped in the boardroom and were treated to pizza for lunch! During our lunch, we were joined by a diverse panel of Bayer professionals who introduced themselves told us all a little bit about their background and their work at Bayer. After lunch and thanking the panel for their time, we headed downstairs to participate in a hands-on activity that mimicked the science of tracking disease by inspecting samples and referring to a checklist for tell-tale signs of illness in plants. We then headed back upstairs to take part in a market research survey to compare and contrast the tastes of tomatoes. And we learned that taste-preferences can vary widely in the global market.

We concluded this trip with a “closing circle” that asked students to recall something they learned during their tour at Bayer. We thanked our hosts and departed.

Horse Barn, Healthy Buffet, and Hearty Bouquets

FARMS Leadership | Sacramento Valley | January 23, 2020

Location(s) of the Field Day:

UC Davis Animal Science Horse Barn
448 La Rue Road, Davis CA 95616

Tercero Dining Commons

237 Tercero Hall Circle, Davis CA 95616

Bowley Plant Science Teaching Facility
1200 Ext Center Drive, Davis CA 95616

UC Davis Student Farm
1050 Ext Center Drive, Davis CA 95616

UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden Headquarters
448 La Rue Road, Davis CA 95616

The Sacramento Valley field day at U.C. Davis began in the Cole Facility, a four-building compound dedicated to metabolism and physiology research. Our class was welcomed and given an overview of the facilities by Ben Rupchis (Goat Facility Manager) and Caleb Sehnert (Meat Lab Manager). Once we reviewed our itinerary, we conducted a warm-up activity that divided our class into small groups. Once in small groups, our class was led through separate, short tours to provide our collective a more especial and personalized look at the compound’s numerous operations and facilities, including: the horse barn, a literal barn where horses give birth as well as the stables and bullpens.

Following our tour of the Cole Facility, students, teachers, and FARMS staff walked the U.C. campus to convene at the the Tercero Dining Commons, a sprawling 30,000 square-foot, multi-level food court that features a plethora of domestic and international cuisines ranging from black-bean veggie burgers and pizza by the slice to made-to-order Mongolian-style bbq, schwarma, and various seafood dishes.

After our 1-hour lunch break, our collective trekked back to the Cole Facility to caravan across campus and reconvene at U.C. Davis’ organic garden.

Once regrouped, our class was dispersed into pairs. The single requirement for these student partnerships was that students must not be from the same school. Following introductions and the forming of new allegiances, pairs were tasked with an intra-garden scavenger hunt!

Students (and accompanying teachers too!) were provided checklists to aid in the hunt for various fruits, vegetables, herbs, and spices. Most notable were the spicy mustard leaves that taste like wasabi and Meyers lemons, a cross between lemon and a mandarin orange, that can be eaten like an orange because of its higher sugar content.

After completing the organic garden scavenger hunt, we toured the Bowley Plant Science Teaching Facility, a wing of classrooms and labs that serve as instruction and research space for the Plant Sciences and Plant Biology Departments.

Following the Bowley Plant Science Teaching Facility tour, we headed outside to survey and explore the U.C. Davis Student Farm and Nursery. This 23-acre space is the foundation for U.C. Davis’ Agricultural Sustainability Institute; The land is maintained and operated exclusively by students, as has been tradition since its original founding in 1977. Today, it continues to serve as the Research and Development grounds for creating sustainable food systems and hosts many agriculture-based programs, studies, and ventures.

The final leg of this marathon field day ended near the Cole Facility, the start-line for this journey. The U.C. Davis Arboretum and Public Garden Headquarters is a gorgeous, verdant, and seemingly infinite outdoor space that hugs 100-acres of the 85-mile-long Putah Creek, within the 640-acre U.C. Davis Putah Creek Riparian Reserve. Once we became completely surrounded by trees, bushes, and flowers, we were met by Waterway Steward-extraordinaire and CLBL Alum Nina Suzuki. Suzuki, guided us through the history and purposes of the arboretum and riparian reserve and her work in ecological preservation and advocacy. We concluded this field day with a “debriefing circle”, reflecting on all we had learned.

Sustainable to the Last Fiber

FARMS Leadership | Tehama | Thursday, January 16, 2020

Location of Field Day:
Sierra Pacific Industries – 19794 Riverside Ave. Anderson, CA 96007

Field Day Host(s) and Mentors:
Kristy Lanham, Community Relations Manager Katie Luther, Workforce Development and Communications Coordinator Drew Peterson, Electrical Supervisor Tanner Estes, Safety and Environmental Coordinator Angie Harris, Office Coordinator Fabrication Shop

Theme:
Technology and Manufacturing

Summary of the Day: Tehama County FARMS Leadership kicked off our year on January 16th at Sierra Pacific Industries in Anderson, CA. They have been a generous supporter of our FARMS programs throughout the state and this field day was no exception. While the weather was a bit grey and drizzly, we still took full advantage of our visit and were able to explore their sawmill, cogen plant, and fab/tech shop.

Kristy Lanham, SPI’s Community Relations Manager, and Katie Luther their Workforce Development and Communications Coordinator greeted us and gave some wonderful background information into Sierra Pacific Industries and what sets them apart from many other companies. They truly pride themselves on being a 3rd generation family run company that believes in growing their people, investing in their communities and being sustainable to the last fiber.

Largest crane west of the Mississippi loading logs onto the log deck.

Tanner Estes, Safety and Environmental Coordinator then joined us to be our guide as we headed out to see exactly how they are sustainable to the last fiber. We began by watching the largest crane west of the Mississippi River placing logs on the log deck. These logs have come from somewhere on the 2 million acres of forests Mr. Emmerson owns in CA and WA, making Sierra Pacific the 2nd largest lumber producer in the United States. As the logs enter the sawmill they are run through a de-barker and cut into lengths appropriate for the boards they will be but into. The students were absolutely fascinated by the technology, speed and size of the equipment being used. We met several of the employees that were inspecting the lumber for quality as well as operating some of the equipment along the way. Seeing the process from raw log to 2 X 4 that you could purchase at Home Depot was amazing! As we walked out of the sawmill Tanner talked to us about the waste they produce and how every single fiber is consumed wether it be shipped out as lumber, or used as fuel for their cogen plant. As we stood and watched the cogen steam we learned that they not only produce enough power to run their facility, but they feed energy back into the grid to provide power for much of the community. They also use the steam to dry their own lumber and any of the steam that is left over is looped around and continued in the cycle. Talk about efficient! Wow!

Lastly we headed over to the Fab/Tech Shop where Drew Peterson, Electrical Supervisor, toured us through this very high tech and state-of-the-art facility. We learned that Sierra Pacific designs and builds all of their equipment so they employ computer designers, electrical and mechanical engineers, fabricators, and many others that support this process. As we walked through the fab shop Drew showed how far the technology has come and that it is moving more and more into robotics. This is one of the highest tech operations in our area and truly offers wonderful opportunities for not only careers but also internships for those interested.

Our day wrapped up with a fabulous lunch provided by SPI and an opportunity for questions to be answered. The students were impressed by the company values as well as career opportunities they learned about. Many were surprised that they could begin a job right out of high school if they wanted and grow within the company into a very respectable career position. They also were intrigued with the scholarship opportunities that SPI offers to the children of their employees. Thank you Sierra Pacific Industries for all you pour into our program and the youth of today!