Ag Mechanics at Los Molinos High School

FARMS Leadership| Tehama County | December 7, 2018

Location of Field Day:
Los Molinos, CA

Participating High Schools: 
Los Molinos High, Mercy High, Red Bluff High, Corning High

Field Day Host:
Los Molinos High School

Participating Partners:
Shasta Junior College Welding Department
Principal Miguel Barriga, Los Molinos High School
Becky Roe, Sierra Pacific Industries, A&R Custom Butchering

Theme:
Ag. Mechanics, Interview Preparation

Summary of the Day:
Calling all mechanics, welders, fabricators, and computer geeks!! This day was one for the books. While holding field days at our high schools is not the norm, we were excited for Tehama County’s FARMS Leadership students to get the true hands-on experience with local industry in the various ag mechanics fields that we highlighted: welding, heavy equipment operating, computer programming, laser engraving, and job interview preparedness.

Shasta College sent two of their top students to teach our FARMS Leadership group the art and skills required to become a welder.
Many of our students had never had this opportunity before, so using Los Molinos’ individual welding bays was a safe and fun way to experience this! Safety was key to this day, and as a group, we received a detailed safety presentation from Michael Kling, the Los Molinos Ag Instructor before any activities started.

“I learned that lifting the arc makes the puddle wider and also makes it hotter.” – Forrest Powell, Los Molinos High School

For those students whose interest is peaked by heavy equipment operation, they were able to get hands-on by driving a front end loader through a course of barrels and even test their backing skills. Gabe Harris, a FARMS Advanced student, gave each student a lesson in the safe, proper operation of the equipment. It was such fun to see the expressions from those who had never driven a tractor before. Memories were surely made!

“I had a lot of fun driving the tractor!” – Hannah Endres, Corning High School

Those students who are interested in computer programming and art or design loved the rotation where they were introduced to a laser engraver and how it can be used in conjunction with computer design to create some awesome pieces. Each school was able to create a design on the computer, their school name with the FARMS Leadership logo that was then engraved on a wooden sign. It was amazing how precise the engraver was. Every detail was transferred from the computer design to the finished product.

“I learned how to use a laser table and found out it produces very intricate and detailed art work. They can be used on glass, wood, metal and leather!”

Itzel Favela, Red Bluff High School

While it is always fun exploring careers in agriculture, the next step to explore and learn the necessary skills for is… How do I get a job? What does an interview look like? Mrs. Becky Roe from Sierra Pacific Industries joined us to help teach these skills. She led an open discussion with the students encouraging questions about how to fill out an application, the important part of your resume and cover letter, and they participated in a role-play activity showing students how to act and the importance of your first impression when you are called in for an interview. Each student gained the knowledge of how to properly dress, shake hands, speak, and that it is ok to ask questions.

“I learned that your social media can effect your job.” – Kylee McCormick, Corning High School

Special Thank You to A&R Custom Butchering for donating all the tri-tip for our lunch!

Tehama County Mosquito Abatement meets FARMS Advanced

FARMS Advanced| Tehama County | November 8, 2018

Location of Field Day
Red Bluff, CA

Field Day Host
Andrew Cox, Tehama County Mosquito Vector Control

Participating Schools
Red Bluff High School
Orland High School
Mercy High School
Los Molinos High School

Theme
Integrated Pest Management

Summary of the Day:
In 1917 Los Molinos, CA had an outbreak of malaria, people were sick and dying. The world had already experienced this scenario during the building of the Panama Canal where the French people that were working on the canal were dying in huge numbers. It was discovered that malaria was being transferred to people by being bit by an infected female mosquito that was a carrier. So in 1917, Northern California created a mosquito vector control to help control the population of mosquitoes and therefore help eradicate malaria..

In the beginning years, they would float oil on the surface of the water to suffocate the mosquito larvae. Since then, we have come so far with the development of new chemicals and methods of controlling this deadly pest. Currently, Tehama County Mosquito Control is built of a team of men who assess the problems in their region and treat accordingly. Depending on whether they are having an issue with adults or larvae they decide which practice is best; treating the water, or fogging for adults.

“There are over 200 species of mosquitoes and some can go dormant for years.” -Stephanie Mills, Red Bluff High School

Water treatment is the easiest method and will kill the larvae before ever maturing into adults. The best approach in water is introducing the Mosquito Fish into bodies of water. These little fish feed on the larvae, stay about the size of a guppy, and are close to 100% effective! The public can pick up these fish at our local office to use in livestock water troughs, ponds, or any other standing water. There are also a couple of chemicals labeled for use in water. One is BTI which kills them, the other is Methoprene which causes them to have reproduction issues.

“It is crazy that female mosquitoes are the only ones that bite!” ~Gabe Harris, Los Molinos High School

Fogging for adults is the second method of controlling the mosquito. This is a very labor intensive task, and during peak mosquito season the technicians often work 14-16 hour days to be able to service their region. The air has to be just right, and typically they do it very early mornings. Each technicians truck is outfitted with a drop machine (fogger) that puts out about 4oz of permethrin per acre and is effective in reducing the population of adult mosquitoes and even some flies.

Spending the day with Tehama County Vector Control was not only educational, but fun! The students enjoyed the time spent with our local technicians and learning about the services they offer. Thank you Mosquito Abatement for your time and knowledge!!

Sierra Pacific Industries

FARMS Leadership| Tehama County | November 6, 2018

Location of Field Day:
Richfield, CA

Field Day Host:
Sierra Pacific Industries – Becky Roe and Kristy Lanham

Participating Partners:
Bill Carol, Joe Puentes, Christina Max, Jeff Jackman, Jim Hansen

Theme:
Technology and Manufacturing

Summary of the Day:
After such a severe wildfire year in CA, it was very fitting to visit Sierra Pacific Industries (SPI) and learn from one of the leaders in the logging and lumber industry what really happens to all those burnt trees after a major forest fire such as the Carr Fire.

Spending our day at SPI Richfield we were exposed to two different processing facilities: their remanufacturing plant and one of their millwork plants. Students broke up into two groups and had to opportunity to tour one of the plants and then did a speaking activity by presenting to the other group as well as SPI staff what they learned, careers they saw and what their favorite part was. Learning skills such as public speaking, preparing a presentation in a short amount of time, as well as how to collaborate with other students are all an important part of our FARMS Field Days. Some of the key things they learned exploring the facilities were:

“The wood in the Millwork was cut into small pieces and glued back together to form bigger pieces, then they press the wood to keep it’s form.”                                                                                                              – Melanie Flores, Orland High School Student

“Some of the jobs in the Reman facility are: chain pullers, banding, optimizer operator, and forklift driver.”                                                   -Zach Skaggs, Red Bluff High School Student

 

SPI and Red Emmerson are the largest private land owner with over 2 million acres of land between California and Washington. Therefore, they have very detailed processes and procedures for how they handle their land after a wildfire has roared through. Joe Puentes, one of their lead foresters, gave a wonderful presentation on the importance forest management and how they manage their forests differently being a private company versus a government agency as well as the extreme urgency of time to replant the forests and restore the environmental balance as quickly as possible.

“After a fire they replant double to amount of trees.”                            – Clayton Cox, Corning High School Student

” 12,000 trees a day can be planted for a crew of 12 laborers!”           – Forrest Powell, Los Molinos High School