5 Departments, 1 Hour

FARMS Leadership | San Joaquin x Sacramento Valley | Friday, February 12th, 2021

Location(s) of Field Day:
U.C. Davis Department of Animal Sciences — Davis, CA

Field Day Host(s) and Mentors:
Aaron Prinz – Animal Facilities Manager, Interim Swine Facilities Manager
Kelli Davis – Horse Barn Manager
Benjamin A. Rupchis – Goat Teaching and Research Facility Manager
Kristy Portillo – Avian Facility Manager
Caleb Sehnert – Meat Laboratory Manager

Theme:
Post-Secondary Education in Agriculture and Careers in Animal Learning

Summary of the Day:
This non-recorded, virtual field day with the Sacramento Valley and San Joaquin FARMS Leadership classes feature several Animal Facilities within U.C. Davis’ Animal Sciences Department. Animal Facilities Manager and head of the 11 Animal Facilities Departments, Aaron Prinz, hosted our FARMS Leadership students for a 1-hour Zoom tour of five of the 11 Departments. Following introductions and a review of the Animal Facilities Manager’s background and career history, FARMS students enjoyed a private screening of video presentations of each of the featured Manager’s Facilities. The digital format of this field day, presented the opportunity to visit and learn about over twice as many U.C. Davis Animal Facilities; as compared with previous field days, due to time and logistical constraints. Hands-on Learning Kits for this field day included some official U.C. Davis-branded swag and Pepperoni Snack Sticks, complements of U.C. Davis’ Meat Laboratory.   

For more information about the U.C. Davis Animal Sciences Department, ‘click’ the link below:

UC Davis Department of Animal Science

Wildlife, livestock and nature—just a day in the life of college student!

FARMS Leadership| San Joaquin| February 6, 2020

Location of Field Day:
UC Davis, including California Raptor Center, Goat Barn, Dairy Goat Parlor & Creamery, Dining Commons, and Arboretum

Field Day Hosts:
CA Raptor Center and UC Davis
UC Davis Animal Science Department
UC Davis Arboretum & Public Garden

Theme of the Day:
Exploring unique classrooms at UC Davis while learning about animal science.

Summary:
We started our day at the CA Raptor Center at UC Davis. Here, students learned some cool facts about raptors and about the connections between raptors and agriculture. They got to tour the center and meet the resident birds. Next we walked next door to the Goat Barn and the new Dairy Goat Parlor and Creamery. Here, students got to meet dairy and meat goats, and got to tour the brand new milking parlor and creamery. Our Animal Science student and staff hosts helped everyone understand how the milking process works, how goat cheese is made, and highlighted opportunities for internships and coursework in Animal Sciences at UC Davis.

Our next stop was lunch. When on a college campus, we like to take students to eat at the dining commons so they can experience this important aspect of student life and envision themselves as a college student. We ate at Tercero Dining Commons, where students and teachers alike enjoyed the many choices, including UC Davis Student Farm grown veggies!

Our final stop of the day was a visit to the UC Davis Arboretum. Here, we enjoyed some more of the beautiful scenery that UC Davis offers, learned that ducks should NOT eat bread, and learned about the many opportunities for UCD students to participate in internships with the Arboretum and Public Gardens. These internships exist in many topics that intersect with campus life and the outdoors, including health science, landscape design, habitat restoration, food access and wildlife conservation.

Veterinarians in training

FARMS Leadership Program | Kern County | Tuesday, January 30, 2020

Location of Field Day:
UC Davis Veterinary Medicine Teaching and Research Center
18830 Rd 112, Tulare CA

Field Day Host
Dr. Melissa Macias Rioseco
Karen Tonooka
Jennifer Crook

Theme
Veterinary Science

Summary of the Day:
On Friday, January 30, 2020, the Kern County FARMS Leadership Program from McFarland High school started off their year at the UC Davis Veterinary Medicine Teaching and Research Center. We first met with Dr. Melissa Macias Rioseco and started watching a Necropsy (an Autopsy on an animal) video of a calf. She was explaining to us the different organs throughout the video and what was abnormal as the kids were trying to diagnosis what was wrong with the sick calf. No one got sick haha! They loved it! The calf ended up having pneumonia and the kids guessed it correctly.

We then met in the Milk Quality lab with Karen Toonka as she talked about in detail how they take their milk samples and diagnosis the issue going on in the dairy. They can test for almost anything in a little sample of milk. They start off by taking a tiny drop and putting the milk into a dish and incubating it for 24-48 hours as the bacteria soon grows inside the dishes. They then take samples under the microscope and solve the problem by figuring out which pathogen is causing the issue. The students loved it! They got to look under the microscope at a bacteria called Mycoplasma. They described it as looking at a fried egg. It has a cell in the middle with a clear membrane wall around it.

We then moved onto the PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) lab with Jennifer Crook. She went into detail on molecular biology. Using small samples they are able to make copies of short sections of DNA where they are then able to identify bacteria, viruses and much more. It was great to see the lab and all the machines they use on completing these steps. Lots of information to take in and the kids loved every second of it!

We then went back to our starting point to have some delicious lunch and snacks. After lunch we did a fun activity that the students loved! We were practicing being veterinarians and giving intramuscular and subcutaneous injections to our orange patients. We started off with green food coloring and was giving a subcutaneous shot. A subcutaneous shot is a injection given under the skin. When we then cut into the oranges the green food coloring should be on the perimeter of the skin. We then used red food coloring for the intramuscular shot. A intramuscular shot is an injection given directly into the muscle. When cutting open the orange the red food coloring should appear in the meat of the orange. This showed the kids different ways shots are given in the livestock world. Everyone showed their true vet skills and did it correctly! Thank you UC Davis Veterinary Medicine Teaching and Research Center for a day filled of great information and fun for myself and the kids! Can’t wait to come back we loved it!