A Day in the Woods

After a bit of a drive, Tehama FARMS Advanced was greeted with the fresh mountain air on a late spring morning and temperatures that didn’t even warrant a sweatshirt. Sierra Pacific Industries invited our group to attend the Sierra Cascade Logging Conference Inc. “In Woods Forest Harvest Demonstration Day”. This is a day where a group of industry supporters take the time to carve out of the forest a 1-mile trail for groups of students who are led by experts in logging to hike and stop at several stations to see the very impressive logging equipment at work as well as meet and network with a variety of industry professionals.

Once we had been properly fitted with fancy hard hats to ensure everyone was exercising supreme safety, we started off following our leader who was a Wildlife Biologist for Sierra Pacific Industries. As we wandered through the woods we heard from many different local volunteer programs such as The Backcountry Horsemen and Shasta County Search and Rescue and the different ways they work with our logging industry to accomplish different tasks. Not only did we meet volunteer units, we also met Jim Lepage from Lepage Company who’s focus is building and maintaining the logging roads. He spoke with the students about the career opportunities with heavy equipment and why their jobs are so important to the logging companies. Of course safety comes first, so without quality roads the big rig drivers driving heavy loads of logs could not safely get in and out of these deep woods locations, but also how roads that they can safely drive a moderate speed on will increase efficiency and the number of loads one trucker can make with logs in a day. Time = Money.

As we rounded the bend we could hear the loud sound of a saw and smell the fragrance of freshly cut wood. This began our walk into what truly happens in the forest during a harvest. First we learned the different ways there are to fall, or cut down, a tree. We heard from a 30 year wood cutter about the tools and manual labor that goes into cutting a tree by hand which he demonstrated on a HUGE pine tree right in front of us. It was amazing to see his skill, precision, and speed with his chainsaw as well as the ability to make the tree fall exactly where he wanted. He was able to fall and cut into logs roughly 50 trees a day and therefore is used to process the trees who’s trunks are too large in diameter for the heavy equipment that we watched but are able to do closer to 1500-2000 trees in a day. We then followed the process to the landing site that was set up where a harvester was delimbing and cutting trees into “logs” of appropriate length, then a feller-buncher was gathering and loading logs onto a truck to be hauled off the mountain and to a processing plant. It was such an amazing experience to see first hand these GIANT machines at work and meet the men who were behind the controls.

Thank you too all those who took part at the In Woods Demonstration Day and Sierra Pacific Industries for inviting us to take part. The students thoroughly enjoyed it and have a much greater understanding and appreciation for the logging industry as a whole. We hope to be apart of it in the future!

Beneficials at SunView


FARMS Program | Kern County |April 9, 2019

Participating Schools
Frontier High School
Bakersfield Christian High School
Independence High School

The good bugs are eating the bad bugs! These students witnessed this first-hand last year as part of FARMS Leadership’s tour of Bakersfield College back in 2018.

Today, they were able to see partner SunView Vineyards ingenuity on breeding these beneficial bugs! While this isn’t a new practice, it is unusual to have the breeding facility onsite. Other companies tend to buy their predatory mites from a distributor.

We spent the afternoon with Cristina Gomez, Assistant Director of Entomology at Sun View Vineyards. As part of Cristina’s duties, she manages the Beneficial Insectory.

The Predator Mite Greenhouse

We followed Cristina to the greenhouses. The first greenhouse was the breeding ground for the predatory mite. Cristina described how they maintain the environment for breeding. They need humid and warm conditions. We walked out to get a bit of fresh air and then headed into the next greenhouse. This greenhouse is breeding the spider mites to feed the predatory mites. We discussed the irrigation that it takes to maintain the environment as well.

Students were able to meet Marco Zaninovich, Owner and talk about FARMS Leadership and how it has made an impact on them. It was a great afternoon! Thank you, Sun View Vineyards!

It Was Coming Up Roses in Wasco, CA


FARMS Advanced Program | Kern County |April 9, 2019

Participating Schools
Frontier High School
Bakersfield Christian High School
Independence High School

40% of the nation’s roses come from Wasco, California! Wasco sits just northwest of Bakersfield and is known for its Roses. People travel to come to the Annual Festival of Roses every Labor Day to see the beauty that is blossoming in Wasco, CA.

We arrived at Weeks Roses in Wasco and were greeted by Manager, Stu Chamberlain. He helped us get an up close and personal look at the growing, shipping, packing, and practices in place to protect the product through Integrated Pest Management. Stu shared that they are one of the largest rose growers in the world. A couple of key customers are Amazon and Home Depot! We toured the cold storage where we learned how the roses are forced into dormancy. Pesty fungus and mold are a concern in the cold storage and they use a general fungicide to treat those issues. As we walked into the cold storage we sat 257 varieties of roses!

Touring the Cold Storage

“I don’t think I even knew that there were that many types of roses!” Said Casey Sprayberry, FARMS Advanced student from Independence High School.

There were other containers that were being prepared for shipping. Containers of grapes, figs, iris, and cherries. Weeks also partners with the university extension office and Cal Poly Pomona to learn about stone fruit and other various crops. It was now time to walk through the greenhouse and learn about Greenhouse Management.

Assisting with pest management, ID Services LLC’s Alan Butterfield, walked us through the nursery teaching us about the different pests they battle. Mr. Butterfield taught the students the symptoms to look for. We shadowed him as he talked us through his daily practice, then it was time for the students to give it a try. Students scanned the crop to put a numerical grade on the percent damaged by the pest. We then discussed what to do when we found damage. We discussed Label Identification, Recommendation, and classes of insecticides. Students were able to remove who plants when the pest had taken over too much and it was a complete loss.

From the Greenhouse Tour, we took a driving tour of the planted fields. Iris was in bloom and beautiful! There was cover crop planted to restore the soil in some lots. We talked about the grains of that field being sent to cereal companies. After our tour, each student received a catalog of roses and they were able to choose one to take home. What a gift!!

Thank you Stu Chamberlain, Alan Butterfield and staff! It was a great day out at Weeks Roses. We can’t wait to come back!

IPM Everything

Program: FARMS Advanced Leadership Program

Region: CV Advanced

Field Date:  Thursday, April 4, 2019

Location of Field Day: Selma Library

Theme: Revisiting what we learned about IPM

On Thursday, April 4, 2019, FARMS Advanced students from the Central Valley gathered at the Selma Library to review and revisit what they learned about IPM throughout their year.  We reviewed every pillar topic from each Field Day and discussed how they were alike and/or different Those pillar topics were how Regulation, Sustainability, Footprint, Media, Water, IPM and Careers, Technology & Innovation, Labor and Politics in relation to IPM.  After this we had a group lunch and talked about our final thoughts about IPM and their future in Agriculture or Program as a possible intern.

Monkeyflower Ranch

FARMS Advanced | Monterey and Santa Cruz | April 4, 2019

Participating Schools:

Soledad High School

Location(s): Monkey Flower Farms, 1481 San Miguel Canyon Rd. Royal Oaks, CA 95076

Field Day Host(s) and Mentors:

Rebecca King – Owner and operator of Monkey Flower Ranch

Summary of the Day:

We started the day with a hearty breakfast of bacon, eggs, and sheep yogurt straight off the Farm. Over brealfast, we learned about Rebecca King and what motivated her to become a farmer. The tour of the farm began promptly after and students were able to see Lambs and the machine that milks them apart from their mothers. They saw sheep, pigs, chickens, and ducks. Students were given an opportunity to milk a sheep for the first time. Rebecca King sells sheep and pigs for meat. The sheep are harvested for milk and chickens produce eggs. All the food she feeds her animals is a waste product from another industry. Pigs are feed old veggies and fruits from a partnering farm as well as spent hops and grains from an organic brewery in the area.

Monkey Flower Ranch operates as sustainably as possible by providing habitat for pollinators and wildlife with hedgerow, and also by rotating the animals between several different pastures to ensure that the land isn’t overgrazed and has time to regrow.

The largest part of the ranch operation is the cheese making and Rebecca has cleverly labeled her cheese Garden Variety Cheese. Students learn about how cheese is made and how technical the process is to ensure food safety. A quick walk through the cheese caves awaked students senses and got them ready for lunch. Students helped make lunch which was a farm fresh cobb salad complete with Garden Variety Cheese samples. After lunch, we did some planning and social media marketing activities where students had a chance to make some promotional items for the Ranch to market an upcoming Open House.

Ag Tech Summit

FARMS Advanced | Monterey and Santa Cruz | March 27, 2019

Participating Schools:

Soledad High School

Location(s): Hartnell College, 411 Central Ave, 93901

Field Day Host(s) and Mentors:

Hartnell College

Ag Commissioner’s Office

UC Cooperative Extension

Summary of the Day:

Students had the opportunity to attend the Ag Tech Summit at Hartnell College. This year students spent the morning listening to a series of talks about entomology and pest management happening locally.  

Asian Citrus Psyllid Regulation Update – Tim Lewis, Monterey County Agriculture Commissioner’s Office

Weed Management in Vegetable Crops Using an IPM Approach – Dr. Steven Fennimore, UC Cooperative Extension

Managing Vector Spread of Leaf Roll Virus – Larry Bettiga, UC Cooperative Extension

Over lunch, students had the opportunity to sit down with an industry professional and practice networking as a group. From there we split up into groups to practice networking at the different tabling exhibits. Students met folks from many different industries and ask questions as well as answered questions about themselves and their goals after high school.

After 45 minutes of networking we all came together to discuss the challenges they faced when networking like:

  • Not knowing what to ask as a follow-up question
  • Or asking an awkward follow-up question
  • Overcoming nerves
  • Stumbling on your words

We also covered some of the information they discovered like:

  • Internship opportunities
  • New tech startups
  • Youth programs they can sign up for
  • College programs they can do in the future

Study Close to Home

FARMS Advanced | Monterey and Santa Cruz | March 14, 2019

Participating Schools:

Soledad High School

Location(s): CSU Monterey Bay 100 Campus Center Seaside, Ca

Field Day Host(s) and Mentors:

  • Thomas Harvath – Associate Dean of the College of Science
  • Kali Prescott – Lab Technician at the Haffa Research Lab
  • Alejandro Del Pozo – Cooperative Extension Monterey County – Entomology
  • Scott Fausti – Associate Director of College of Business

Summary of the Day:

It’s college day and students arrived on the CSUMB campus with a smile. During breakfast, we were welcomed to the college by Thomas Harvath who shared his pathway to CSUMB and some of the interests that lead him to a career in education and science. Dr. Harvath spoke about CSUMB and their new Ag Science Major that will no doubt attract many students from our region that want to go to college but have to stay close to home. Next, we met up with Kali Prescott a brilliant young CSUMB graduate who does research at Haffa Labs. She gave us a tour of the Haffa Lab and talked about her current work in Biogeochemistry and Bioremediation. She showed us the equipment that she used to quantify Nitrous Oxide Emissions with samples pulled from farms in the area. The take samples and test for chemicals that may be left behind from fumigation or pesticide applications. Students had some great questions about her research. Seeing a research lab up close and personal was a first for many students and gave students an opportunity to think about whether working in a lab like this might be something they would like to do in the future.

Next on the agenda was a campus tour were students saw dorm rooms and learned about life on campus. We happened to be on campus during finals and the library and classrooms were extremely busy places. Campus life wouldn’t be complete without checking out the dining hall and campus transportation via the lime Scooters. After some playtime we got serious.

Dr. Alejandro Del Pozo stopped by to talk about Entomology and his career as the areas IPM Advisor. He spoke about how humans categorize bugs as good and bad but that there really is no such thing as a good bug and a bad bug. As an advisor for the Agricultural Extension office, Dr. Del Pozo works with the public to bridge the gap between research being done at the college level and translate it into best practices for farmers, home-owners, and anyone interested in managing populations of insects. The day ended with a tour of the College of Business facility with Dr. Scott Fausti the Associate Director of the College of Business. The college of business is huge at CSUMB and many of FARMS students are interested in Ag Business as a major. The day ended with a gift of CSUMB swag and students where on the road back to school.

IPM

Program: FARMS Leadership Program

Region: Central Valley FARMS Advanced

Field Date:  Tuesday, March 12, 2019

Location of Field Day: Ingleby Farms and Forests

Field Day Host(s) and Mentors: Nick Cantana

Theme: IPM

Summary of the Day:  Upon arrival to Ingleby, we were joined by 2 scientist with Ag-Biotech.  They walked us through what Ag-Biotech does and how it helps it’s farmers and growers.  In Genomics Services, developing crop breeds can be a tricky business. There are so many variables, so many potential pitfalls, and so little time.  Count on Ag-Biotech to empower you and give you the peace of mind you need to get your products to market, quickly and confidently. Our state-of-the-art genomic testing services—starting with our signature Marker Assisted Selection (MAS)—help you to grow your new breeds, and your business.  We bring you more than 20 years of experience. We’re trusted by breeders around the world. We deliver the speed and transparency you deserve. And we’re surprisingly affordable, given our high-touch service. They are also experts in Seed Health Testing. You can’t buy or sell seeds unless they’re clean. But you also know that pathogen testing can get time-consuming and costly, especially during peak seasons—and especially when your options are limited. Now you have a new choice: Seed Health Testing Services from Ag-Biotech, the premiere independent crop genomics lab with more than 20 years of trusted expertise. Our seed health laboratory is exclusively dedicated to getting you the results you need, the way you want them, at a price that meets your budget. Whether you’re a seed producer looking to market your product, a buyer seeking to test a potential purchase, or even another lab needing surge support and third-party verification, you can have it all from Ag-Biotech.  After, learning about Ag-Biotech and how it relates also to IPM we went out to the field and cleaned out an owl boxes and held baby owls. Ingleby uses owls as natural rodent control in their field. We had a great day!

FARMS Advanced visits Chico State

FARMS Advanced| Tehama County | March 5, 2019

Location of Field Day
Chico, CA

Field Day Host
Sarah DeForest, College of Agriculture Director of External Relations

Participating Schools
Red Bluff High School
Orland High School
Mercy High School
Los Molinos High School

Theme
College Exploration, Integrated Pest Management

Summary of the Day:

The morning began with meeting Sarah DeForest, the director of external relations, at the Chico State Farm. There we began our networking and practiced our professional introductions. Sarah invited us on a tour where we visited each of their 4 animal units; dairy, beef, swine, sheep as well as saw how diverse they are with having 800 acres of orchards, row crops and garden plots with green houses.

At the dairy unit, we learned about there operation and how and why they transitioned from a conventional herd to the current organic herd they have which allows them to market “organic milk”. With the current milk market, and the college operating a small herd of 80 cows they are able to sell their milk for a higher price as organic as well as give their students a leg up in the industry by learning the practices that come with organic farming. We toured the milking parlor which can hold 6 cows at a time and is equipped with automatic grain feeders as well as RFID readers that record the data from each cow as they enter and are milked. Then we went out and saw all the calves that are bottle raised and will be used as replacement cows as they get older and are ready to join the milk string. Of course everyone loved them! We went on to see the swine unit which houses 30 sows with their largest market for the babies being project hogs for local 4-H and FFA kids. Next we saw the sheep unit where they raise Southdowns, Suffolk, and Hampshires all again which are bred and raised for market or breeding animal youth projects. Lastly we explored the beef unit where we learned about their past partnership with Sierra Nevada Brewery which demonstrated the importance of networking as well as saw their current production feed experiment and the technology associated with it.

After our fun with the livestock units, we joined a Plant Science 101 lab and were able to see hands on how a college laboratory goes. The students jumped right in and joined the lab groups which were testing the nitrogen levels in soil between two different test groups, one with an additive and one that was a control.

Lastly, we headed over to the main campus for a quick lunch in the dining hall, followed by a brief tour of campus. I can not thank Chico State enough for this opportunity to showcase the school to our FARMS Advanced students!

What’s the Buzz About?

FARMS Advanced | Kern County | February 27, 2019

Participating Schools
Frontier High School
Bakersfield Christian High School
Independence High School

We had been waiting all year for this! It was Apiology day! The almond trees were in bloom and it was time to hear and experience the honeybee industry. Jimmy Gardner of United Honeybees allowed us to come and experience the world of bees with him.

We started with conversations about the lifecycle of the bee and the honey bee business. Bees have a community and they are like any other animal. They need to be fed, watered and cared for. We studied the facts of the honeybee.

Here are some facts that shocked students:

  • Bees are the only insect in the world that makes food that humans eat.
  • Honeybees pollinate $15 billion of crops every year
  • Honey has natural preservatives so bacteria can’t grow in it
  • 85% of plants exist because of bees
  • 1/3 of all the food we eat depends on pollinators
  • More than 100 types of crops are pollinated by bees in the US – including clover and alfalfa that feed our cows
  • Beekeeping has a migration route throughout the US. Their timing is critical and weather dependent.

After we discussed the facts of bees and the benefits of honey, we went out to experience them first hand!

We walked and did exactly what Jimmy Gardner does on the daily. The feeling of the wind produced from the bees wings as they land on your hood is a feeling that you can’t explain. Your first reaction is to swat them, but then you remember that you are safe in the suit. You see and hear them working hard to care for their queen. We were able to label the drone bees versus the worker bees. Then we found her! We found the Queen!

It was a great day! Thank you for hosting us, Redhouse Beef. Thank you for teaching us, United Honeybees!