Monterey County Food Bank and Salinas Valley Recycles

FARMS Leadership | Monterey & Santa Cruz | April 12, 2018

Locations of Field Day:
Food Bank – 815 W Market St. #5, Salinas CA 93901
Sun St. Transfer Station – 139 Sun Street Salinas, CA 93901

Field Day Host(s) and Mentors:
Monterey County Food Bank – Sandra Nunez
Salinas Valley Solid Waste Authority – Estela Gutierrez

Theme:
Food Waste and Food Systems

Summary of the Day
Students started the day by learning about the Food Bank and what they do with the food they receive and how and where it’s distributed. Students asked engaging questions about who is receiving the free food and how they are ending hunger in the county. Students participated in a team building exercise by splitting up into groups and packing bags with non perishable items that are distributed to the individuals. Students had to work together to complete one bag and they did 300 bags all together. We ended our time at the Food Bank with a tour of the facility and saw how they process the perishable foods they receive from various agriculture companies like Taylor Farms and Tanimura and Antel. We left to have lunch at the Sun Street Transfer Station. We finished lunch and had a presentation on composting and food waste. Then Estela talked about the SVSWA Company and the history of waste in our county. We received a tour of the facility and witnessed how much trash comes into the transfer station to be taken to the landfill to live forever.

” I learned that the Japanese use a certain way of compost that doesn’t involve worms [Bokashi].” – Noel Diaz, North Salinas High School

Continue reading “Monterey County Food Bank and Salinas Valley Recycles”

Davis Senior High School at Gilmer Farm

Participating School
Davis Senior High School

Partners/Landowners
Solano Resource Conservation District

Mentors
Nick Gallegar, NCRS Rangeland Management Specialist
Beth Hellman, UC Davis graduate student
Amanda Lindell, UCD graduate student
Laura McGowan, UCD graduate student
Ha Truong, NRCS Agricultural Engineer

Our third and final field day at Gilmer farm was a huge success both for our students and our hedgerow. After arrival, our day started off with a fun game of group juggle to get everyone moving a bit and thinking about each other’s names. Once we were all familiar, we jumped right into our plant pressing activity! Students walked along Dave Gilmer’s already established hedgerow, collecting a number of different native species as well as some invasive. Upon returning to the barn, students wrote descriptions of there plants on the back of cards and get them and the plants into our plant presses. Once those are dry and mounted, students will have their own plant pressings to take home and remember SLEWS with.

After plant pressing, everyone headed out to our hedgerow to see how many of our plants survived, as well as weed around our native plants. Students were diligent to make sure they removed as many weeds as possible without damaging their plants.

Following lunch, students had a full afternoon filled with learning activities. We began the afternoon with mentor interviews, a amazing chance for students to get to know their mentors a bit more and ask them in depth questions about their chosen field and how they got to where they are today. With interviews wrapped up, students got to encounter some wildlife in the form of our current native mammal and birds nest collection. After an initial inspection, each mentor group was assigned two animals that they got to present on to the rest of the group. To wrap up the day, students did a blind taste test with different kinds of citrus, some from the store and the rest local. After comparing the different fruit, everyone did made their best guess at which fruit was which.

We would like to thank our SLEWS mentors for enhancing the students field experience, and our gracious hosts at Gilmer Farm for engaging youth from Davis High School in their habitat restoration work.

Accomplishments
Weeding entirety of the hedgerow

“It was great to interview the mentors because it taught me it is okay to not know what I want to do for a career now, I can figure it out as my interests change.”