Advocating for Future Generations

FARMS Leadership | Central Valley South | Wednesday, February 26, 2020

Location of Field Day:
Sequoia Riverland Trust
Dry Creek Preserve
35220 Dry Creek Dr, 35220 Dry Creek Dr, Woodlake, CA 93286

Field Day Host(s) and Mentors: 
Bud Darwin, Education and Volunteer Director
Sam Weiser, Education Coordinator

Upon arrival, students met and interviewed Bud Darwin & Sam Weiser with Sequoia Riverland Trust. The students introduced Bud and Sam to the group and our day started. Students visited the Native Plant Nursery that is on-site.  They were able to see the different plants and shrubs that were grown there and why it is good to plant them at home to encourage pollination at their homes. Dry Creek Preserve is a 152-acre former gravel quarry located just northwest of Lemon Cove, CA in the town of Woodlake, CA.  The students were able to use iPads and their cell phones with the iNaturalist App. Students could upload pictures of anything they could find and the app community would then help identify what was found. Students did this on the 2-mile hike we took around the preserve. Students also learned how the combination of biological and environmental conditions were important to the local farmers who grazed cattle on this very land.  Students really enjoyed being able to bring the classroom, technology and electronics outdoors. Following the hike, we had lunch and de-briefed on the day. Bud & Sam shared volunteer opportunities with our students and the importance of finding something you enjoy doing when you grow up so you’ll never have to work a day in your life. Thank you for a terrific field day Sequoia Riverlands Trust!

Aquaculture Education

FARMS Leadership | Central Valley North | Wednesday, December 11, 2019

Location of Field Day:
California Department of Fish & WildLife – San Joaquin Hatchery – 17372 Brook Trout Drive, Friant, CA 93626

Field Day Host(s) and Mentors:
William Branch
Cheryl Moxley
Brian Erlandsen

Theme:
Aquaculture and Natural Resources

Summary of the Day:
Students from LeGrand High School, Madera South High School and Firebaugh High School met on Wednesday, December 11th at The San Joaquin Hatchery of California Department of Fish & Wildlife. Students met and practiced an introduction and thank you practice for use in the day for introducing our hosts. Students also learned about the end of the year Community Action Project they would need to complete as a requirement of the FARMS Leadership Program. The Community Action Project is any project undertaken by students that applies the skills and knowledge attained throughout the program to address problems or concerns in the students’ own communities. Students will present what they have contributed to their communities during the last field day in April. Next, we were joined by Cheryl Moxley who runs the FINS Program. The FINS Program is an interpretive nature trail designed to teach children the life cycle of trout. Given the slightly older nature of our group, she covered other more age-appropriate information such as native plants, grant funding information, and interpretive design. Next, students rotated between two programs with lunch provided by FARMS to split up these two rotations. The first was SCARF: A salmon restoration project for the San Joaquin River. This covered topics such as conservation, endangered species, and the science behind genetic matrix and testing. Followed by SJH: The hatchery itself, where we discussed what it takes to raise fish, plant it out, and deal with such things as water quality, biosecurity, and fish health. At the end of the day, students presented thank you’s to all of our hosts. We had a really enjoyable hands-on day. We were very impressed with what the state of California does for our natural resources. Thank you again, William, Cherly, Brian and your entire team.