BEEF. IT’S WHAT’S FOR DINNER.

FARMS Advanced Program | Kern County | Thursday, February 27, 2020

Location of Field Day:
Red House Beef
649 Enos Ln Bakersfield, CA 93314

Field Day Host
Maddie Herndon- Ranch Manager
Debbie Wise- Owner

Summary of the Day: On Thursday, February 27, 2020, the Kern County FARMS Advanced Program from McFarland High School visited Redhouse Beef. We started off the day meeting with their herd manager Maddie Herndon. Maddie started off the tour by telling us the history of the company and when it began. Next, she explained all the different breeds of cattle and described each of their breed characteristics. The majority of their herd is Angus and Red Angus cattle. These two breeds are known for being the best for meat production. We learned a lot about the marbling of meat which is the fat and gives meat a lot of its flavor. We then met with the owner Debbie Wise who explained more about the beef side of the company. Debbie has a lot of knowledge about the agriculture industry and it was very interesting listening to all she had to say.

We then moved onto the grass-fed chickens they raise at Redhouse. The hens are rotated throughout the pasture along with the chicken coop on wheels. It is very impressive. These Red House hens were so pampered living a fat and happy life. There where different varieties of chickens which means they lay different colored eggs. The girls graze on bugs, clover, and grass that make their yolks a bright orange color. Everyone loved them so much that we had to take a picture with them!

Finally, we walked the orchards to look at the almond trees. They were blooming so it was great to see them in this stage. About 20% of the flowers you see on the almond trees will then turn into almonds. The weather plays a huge role in the production of the almond’s trees. Too much chill can knock off the blooms and set them back. A crucial step is the pollination of the trees. Honey bees play a major role with around 80% of the United States crop depending on them for pollination. All bees in the colony have their own jobs. We talked a little about the jobs and how crucial each bee is to the colony. The bee colonies consist of a single queen bee, hundreds of male’s drones and 20,000 plus female worker bees. It was amazing to hear how a small creature has such an important job and how their hive works.

This was an informative experience and we are grateful for our amazing hosts at Redhouse Beef. Thank you! We look forward to our next visit!

Grass-Fed Beef in Kern County

FARMS Advanced Program | Kern County | November 6, 2018

Participating School
Independence High School
Ridgeview High School
Bakersfield Christian High School

Partners/Landowners
Debbie Wise, Owner of Red House Beef
Jessica Pounds, Owner of Moo Creamery Restaurant

Red House Beef’s grass-fed operation is a beautiful sight as you drive down Enos Ln (Hwy 43). Students met at RedHouse on a beautiful morning. We climbed the stairs to a roof-top porch where the view of the entire ranch could be seen. There is something about all of that green grass with cattle grazing, chickens clucking, and that makes you feel like all is right with the world.

Students had the opportunity to take part in the full ranch to table experience at Redhouse while learning what it takes to maintain pastures in a clean environment. Students took pasture samples and learned about the evaluation of the samples done in the lab. The lab is looking for vitamin content as well as pesticide-free, clean samples. Redhouse is not an organically certified, but they do follow as many of the practices as they can to stay “clean” and “Grass Fed” certified.

We discussed mob grazing, the benefits of grass-finished meats and got to take part in weight and health checks. Students ran the chute and experienced pulling tags, retagging, and treating common pink eye using patches instead of antibiotics.

We washed up and it was time for the best burgers ever! Our friends over at Moo Creamery prepared lunch for the whole group. We got to talk to owner Jessica Pounds about her restaurant and her desires behind selecting local vendors (like Redhouse) to feature in Moo’s dishes. Our meal was full of meaningful conversations with questions that get us excited for the future of agriculture.

We discussed the advantages of using poultry for pest management. Redhouse chickens follow the herd of cattle. When the cattle graze for a few days in one pasture they are moved to the next. The chickens are brought into the already grazed pasture to eat pests and fertilize the pasture. The chickens are housed in wagons – a triangular coop on wheels. Debbie Wise, the owner of Redhouse, shared with the students that she is learning about poultry and one of the struggles she has been having is that in certain breeds it is difficult to sex them and she wants to be sure on the ratio of males to females. Little did she know that our very own student, Joshua Crain is a poultry expert and is looking to major in Poultry Science. Joshua, a Junior at Independence High School, shared his knowledge with Debbie on the process of sexing the chickens.

We had a great day learning about a natural approach to ranching. Our livestock students learned that there are new approaches when it comes to cattle management