Organic Since ’88

FARMS Leadership | Sacramento Valley | Thursday, April 29, 2021

Location(s) of Field Day:
Durst Organic Growers — Hungry Hollow, CA

Field Day Host(s) and Mentor(s):
Jim Durst — CEO, Farm Director

Summary of the Day:
This Sacramento Valley FARMS Field Day and Leadership Lesson features a presentation from fourth-generation Yolo County farmer Jim Durst. Though the Durst family’s legacy is the production of large-scale commodity crops, since 1988, Jim is the first in his family to focus the farm on cultivating organic produce. Operating out of Hungry Hollow, just north of California’s Capital, Durst Organic Growers champions the importance of sustainability and eco-conscious practices in every aspect of their operations. The Leadership Lesson included FARMS students’ presentations regarding their 16personalities and CareerOneStop survey’s results. The Hands-On Learning Kit for this Field Day included Durst Organic Growers’ asparagus and a few additional supplies for a home-cooking and picture contest.

Prosciutto-Wrapped Asparagus and Fettuccine Alfredo by Deveion Hopkins
Cheesy Bacon Asparagus and sides by DeAngelo Green

History of Post-Consumer Resources, Environmental Stewardship, and Skills Surveys

FARMS Leadership | San Joaquin | Friday, April 2nd, 2021

Location(s) of Field Day:
CAL-Waste – Galt, CA

Field Day Host(s) and Mentor(s):
Leesa Klotz – Education Coordinator

Summary of the Day:
This San Joaquin FARMS Field Day and Leadership Lesson begins with a historical tour of garbage and waste management in the United States. Beginning with the New York Department of Street Cleaning in 1881, America’s history of sanitation and waste management is actually much newer than many would believe. Our host, Lisa Klotz, guides us through a Virtual Tour of the operations at CAL-Waste and emphasizes, the Moby Duck Spill, the importance of being a conscious consumer, the amount of plastics in the average human diet, and the ways CAL-Waste is doing its part to preserve our planet.

The Hands-On Learning Kits for the CAL-Waste Field Day include samples of silica sand (for making glass bottles), bauxite ore (for making aluminum cans), nurdles (small plastic pellets for making plastic everything), machine-washable CAL-Waste shopping bags, and a pack of wildflower seeds to celebrate Earth Day (April 22nd).

This event concludes with a Leadership Lesson that focuses on FARMS students’ professional development. FARMS students complete a free “16Personalities” personality test, the U.S. Department of Labor’s “CareerOneStop” Interest Assessment, and use the inventory of their proficiencies to deduce their potentials for presented career paths.

‘Click’ the links below for your very own personality and interest assessments:

Free personality test, type descriptions, relationship and career advice | 16Personalities

Interest Assessment | CareerOneStop

Take the Weiß Pill

FARMS Leadership | Sacramento Valley | February 20, 2020

Location of Field Day: Bayer, 37437 CA-16 Woodland, CA 95695

Hosts: Lisa McDaniel, Head of Global Outreach & Engagement

The Sacramento Valley Field Day at Bayer Woodland began in the front lobby of the sprawling, iron-gated compound. We were promptly met by Lisa McDaniel, Head of Global Outreach & Engagement.

Once our entire class arrived, Lisa escorted us to a boardroom on the second floor of an even larger building on the opposite side of the Bayer Woodland campus. Upon arrival at our second meeting place, we conducted an “open circle”, students introduced themselves, we reviewed the day’s itinerary, and we were provided id badges to wear for the duration of our tour. Following a ‘hotel breakfast’ of multigrain bars, muffins, yogurt, juice, and coffee, we headed out for a tour the various research and development facilities.

Our first stops were a series of greenhouses where we learned about the safety measures taken to protect crop yields. We learned about specialty breeding and the genome-tracking processes that ensure the strongest, most drought-resistant produce. We then toured their maintenance facility where we learned that the use of GPS systems can help better track crop development.

After our tour of the grounds, we regrouped in the boardroom and were treated to pizza for lunch! During our lunch, we were joined by a diverse panel of Bayer professionals who introduced themselves told us all a little bit about their background and their work at Bayer. After lunch and thanking the panel for their time, we headed downstairs to participate in a hands-on activity that mimicked the science of tracking disease by inspecting samples and referring to a checklist for tell-tale signs of illness in plants. We then headed back upstairs to take part in a market research survey to compare and contrast the tastes of tomatoes. And we learned that taste-preferences can vary widely in the global market.

We concluded this trip with a “closing circle” that asked students to recall something they learned during their tour at Bayer. We thanked our hosts and departed.

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